Cube-shaped Head

eastiseverywhere:

I betcha didn’t know Rembrandt made copies of Mughal miniatures!

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Four Seated Orientals Beneath a Tree

Netherlands (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with white, on Japanese paper.  

British Museum, London

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Shah Jahan

Netherlands (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink and brush and brown wash on Japanese paper.  

Cleveland Museum of Art

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Shah Jahan, Standing with a Flower and a Sword

India (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink with brown wash on Japanese paper.  

The Frick Collection, New York 

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

The Emperor Timur Enthroned,

India (1654-56)

Pen and wash in Indian ink on Japanese paper.  

Musée du Louvre, Paris

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

A Mughal Nobleman on Horseback

India (1654-56)

Pen and brown ink with brown and grey wash, touched with red and yellow chalk and white heightening on Japanese paper.  

The British Museum, London

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Emperor Jahangir Receiving an Officer 

India (1654-56)

Pen, bistre, and wash on Japanese paper.  

The British Museum, London 

[x]

Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn

Shah Jahan and Dara Shikoh

India (1654-1656)

Pen and brown ink and brown wash, heighted with white bodycolor on Japanese paper.  

The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

[x]

(via mughalshit)

Anonymous asked: YOU COULD SPELL "FISH" AS "GHOTI" AND IT WOULD BE PRONOUNCED THE SAME

factsinallcaps:

THIS IS NOT TRUE.

FOR THOSE UNAWARE OF THIS, UH, “FACT,” THE IDEA IS THAT “GHOTI” COULD BE PRONOUNCED “FISH” IF YOU PRONOUNCE THE GH- AS IN “LAUGH,” THE -O- AS IN “WOMEN,” AND THE “TI” AS IN “AMBITION.”

HOWEVER, THIS FAILS TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THAT THE PRONUNCIATION OF LETTERS IS DEPENDENT ON THEIR POSITION WITHIN THE WORD.

AT THE END OF A WORD OR SYLLABLE, “GH” CAN BE PRONOUNCED LIKE THE LETTER F. THIS IS WHY IT’S PRONOUNCED THAT WAY IN “LAUGH” AND “LAUGHTER” AND “ENOUGH” AND, DEPENDING ON WHO YOU ASK, “VAN GOGH.” AT THE BEGINNING OF A WORD OR SYLLABLE, “GH” IS PRONOUNCED AS AN EXTRA-HARD G-SOUND, AS IN “GHOST” AND “GHOUL” AND “GHASTLY.”

LIKEWISE, “TI” IS NOT PRONOUNCED AS “SH” AT THE END OF A WORD. IN “AMBITION,” IT IS ONLY BECAUSE “TI” IS FOLLOWED BY “O” THAT THERE IS AN “SH” SOUND IN THE WORD AT ALL. THIS IS WHY “RATIO” IS PRONOUNCED WITH AN “SH” SOUND, WHILE “MANTIS” IS PRONOUNCED WITH A “T” SOUND. 

IT’S ALSO IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT, IN WORDS LIKE “AMBITION” AND “NATION,” IT’S NOT THAT THE “TI” IS PRONOUNCED LIKE “SH.” “TION” IS A COMPLETE SYLLABLE, PRONOUNCED “SHUN” OR “SHEN.” IF YOU REMOVE ANY OF THE LETTERS, THE PRONUNCIATION WOULD CHANGE.

"ION" DOESN’T HAVE AN SH- SOUND IN IT. "TIN" DOESN’T HAVE AN SH- SOUND IN IT. "TI" DOESN’T HAVE AN SH- SOUND IN IT. "TON" DOESN’T HAVE AN SH- SOUND IN IT. "TIO" ONLY HAS AN SH- SOUND IN IT IF IT’S PRECEDED BY A VOWEL, AS IN "RATIO," AND EVEN THEN, IT’S PRONOUNCED "SHYO" OR "SHI-O," DEPENDING ON YOUR ACCENT. 

"O" IS RARELY PRONOUNCED AS IN "WOMEN," EXCEPT WHEN IT’S IN THE MIDDLE OF A SYLLABLE. 

THAT’S THE THING. “-GH” IS ONLY PRONOUNCED “F” AT THE END OF A SYLLABLE. “O” IS ONLY PRONOUNCED AS IN “WOMEN” IN THE MIDDLE OF A SYLLABLE. “TI-” IS ONLY PRONOUNCED “SH” AT THE BEGINNING OF A CERTAIN SYLLABLES, AND NEVER BY ITSELF.

WHEN ASSEMBLED IN THAT ORDER, NONE OF THOSE PRONUNCIATIONS WOULD APPLY. IF THEY HAD SPELLED IT “GHOTION,” IT WOULD BE PRONOUNCED “GOSHEN.” IF THEY HAD IT “LAUGHOTI,” IT WOULD BE PRONOUNCED “LAFF-OH-TEE.” 

HOWEVER, SPELLED “GHOTI,” THERE’S NO WAY TO PRONOUNCE IT “FISH” UNLESS YOU PRONOUNCE EVERY LETTER INCORRECTLY, IN WHICH CASE YOU’RE NOT PRONOUNCING “GHOTI” AT ALL, YOU’RE PRONOUNCING “FISH.” “GHOTI” IS PRONOUNCED “GOATY.”

NOW, THE ORIGINAL IDEA BEHIND “GHOTI” WAS MAKING FUN OF THE LACK OF RULES GOVERNING ENGLISH SPELLING AND PRONUNCIATION. THIS IS STUPID AS HELL, BECAUSE THEY HAD TO IGNORE A BUNCH OF THE RULES GOVERNING ENGLISH SPELLING AND PRONUNCIATION IN ORDER TO MAKE FUN OF THEIR NON-EXISTENCE.

THEY LITERALLY PRETENDED THE ESTABLISHED PRONUNCIATION CONVENTIONS DIDN’T EXIST JUST SO THEY COULD MAKE FUN OF ENGLISH FOR NOT HAVING ESTABLISHED NAMING CONVENTIONS, WHICH IS ESPECIALLY AGGRAVATING BECAUSE THIS COULD EASILY BE ACCOMPLISHED WITH THE EXISTING WORD “COLONEL.” 

kittylikesintestines:

 
‘The rings of a tree
By Rob • Mar 15th, 2011 • Category: ModBlog
I first saw this photo on Brian’s page a few days ago, so when I saw he had submitted it to his portfolio gallery I made sure to get it up as soon as possible.  Now there is a fantastic story behind this piece, and since Brian explained it so nicely, I’ll let his words explain the bands.

I don’t remember if i posted about this last year, but here is some scar work i did on a young, Native American girl. In her Blackfoot tribe it is customary to have a line scarred around their arm for each year they’re alive. It is known as Ponn Miistis, which literally translates to “the rings of a tree”. When they run out of room on one arm they move to the other, then the legs, but apparently their average life expectancy is only 43.
Anyhow, her parents are more modernized now and didn’t want her having this done while she was growing up. She was intrigued by her grandfather’s rings, which covered his arms and legs, so decided to come to me from Montana to catch up. Last year i worked on her upper arm and finished it up this time. She’s 24 now.
She promises to be back every year for another line, too!’

I think this is one of the most beautiful and personal pieces of scarification work I’ve ever seen. It’s a continual project, so she has much to look forwards to! So much patience ^^.

kittylikesintestines:

The rings of a tree

By Rob • Mar 15th, 2011 • Category: ModBlog

I first saw this photo on Brian’s page a few days ago, so when I saw he had submitted it to his portfolio gallery I made sure to get it up as soon as possible.  Now there is a fantastic story behind this piece, and since Brian explained it so nicely, I’ll let his words explain the bands.

I don’t remember if i posted about this last year, but here is some scar work i did on a young, Native American girl. In her Blackfoot tribe it is customary to have a line scarred around their arm for each year they’re alive. It is known as Ponn Miistis, which literally translates to “the rings of a tree”. When they run out of room on one arm they move to the other, then the legs, but apparently their average life expectancy is only 43.

Anyhow, her parents are more modernized now and didn’t want her having this done while she was growing up. She was intrigued by her grandfather’s rings, which covered his arms and legs, so decided to come to me from Montana to catch up. Last year i worked on her upper arm and finished it up this time. She’s 24 now.

She promises to be back every year for another line, too!’

I think this is one of the most beautiful and personal pieces of scarification work I’ve ever seen. It’s a continual project, so she has much to look forwards to! So much patience ^^.

(via crazypunkpuertorican)